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New Recipes to Explore the Delights of Aquafaba 


April 25, 2017 by Linda Popescu, MS, RD

Do you know about aquafaba? You should. It is a versatile vegan substitute for eggs and egg whites. Since Dr. Fuhrman advises to keep animal products to a minimum, it is nice to make use of this replacement.

Aquafaba (Latin for water bean) is the meringue-like substance you get when you whip the thick liquid that comes in cans of beans or from cooking dried beans in water. Yes, the stuff that you usually discard when making fresh beans or rinse away when you open a can of beans is actually useful.

No one is exactly sure why whipping the cooking water of beans yields an egg-white consistency, but one thought is the proteins and starches in the bean liquid mimic some of the proteins found in eggs. The starch may help slow the collapse of the foam. 

Dr. Fuhrman has already found some uses for aquafaba. It is great to enhance ‘nice’ cream recipes -- it helps the ice cream retain a creamy texture even after freezing; blended soups are creamier when blended with aquafaba. Also, quiches and mousses -- both come out light and fluffy without the use of eggs. Try our recipes for Broccoli Quiche with Aquafaba and Aquafaba Chocolate Mousse below and see if you think whipped bean juice has a place in your Nutritarian kitchen.

Some tips if you want to try to incorporate  aquafaba into your own recipes:

  • Start with chickpea liquid since it is light in color and mild in flavor. But you could use any light-colored bean’s liquid. Darker colored bean liquids will add color to your dish, which you may not want.
  • Use a hand mixer or a stand mixer to whip up the bean liquid. After beating for five minutes, the liquid will start to form stiff peaks, just like egg whites.  Although a high-powered blender will work for some recipes, using it will not result in the stable foam needed for some applications.
  • Cream of tartar or another acid such as vinegar or lemon juice will stabilize the aquafaba. Use 1/4 teaspoon of cream of tartar or 1/2 teaspoon of vinegar or lemon juice for 3/4 cup of bean liquid. Adding an acid is especially helpful when you are making something that will not be eaten right away as it helps the aquafaba to remain aerated. 
  • Aquafaba can be made using the liquid from canned beans or that from beans cooked in water. 
  • A good substitute measurement for recipes is about 1 tablespoon of aquafaba for one yolk, 2 tablespoons for one egg white and 3 tablespoons for a whole egg.  These are just general guidelines, as the consistency of your aquafaba makes a difference. You can reduce watery bean liquid on the stove to thicken it up. If it’s thick already, this step isn’t necessary.
  • Aquafaba takes on whatever flavors are added to it. The slight beany smell disappears when cooked.

Broccoli Quiche with Aquafaba
Serves: 6

1 large onion, sliced
1 cup chopped mushrooms
5 cups small broccoli florets
14 ounces firm tofu, drained
1/2 cup chickpea aquafaba
1/4 cup unsweetened soy, hemp or almond milk
1/4 cup nutritional yeast
2 tablespoons raw cashew butter
2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
1 teaspoon Bragg Liquid Aminos or reduced-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Heat 2-3 tablespoons of water in a large pan and add sliced onion and mushrooms. Water sauté until onions are tender, adding small amounts of additional water as needed to prevent sticking. Add broccoli and a few more tablespoons of water, cover and cook for 5 minutes or until broccoli is almost tender.

Combine remaining ingredients in a high-powered blender and blend for at least one minute to whip up the aquafaba.

Place onions, mushrooms and broccoli in an eight-inch cake pan that has been wiped with olive oil. Pour blended mixture on top and stir to combine.

Bake for 35-40 minutes or until top is golden brown. Allow to cool for 10 minutes before cutting.

CALORIES 160; PROTEIN 12g; CARBOHYDRATES 15g; SUGARS 3g; TOTAL FAT 6.3g; SATURATED FAT 1g; SODIUM 87mg; FIBER 4.6g; BETA-CAROTENE 375ug; VITAMIN C 70mg; CALCIUM 156mg; IRON 2.2mg; FOLATE 59ug; MAGNESIUM 43mg; POTASSIUM 362mg; ZINC 1.8mg; SELENIUM 4.1ug

Aquafaba Chocolate Mousse
Serves: 3

1 cup baked sweet potato, peeled
1/2 cup frozen cherries
1/2 cup frozen blueberries
1/2 cup natural cocoa powder
6 regular dates or 3 Medjool dates
1 cup whipped aquafaba

Blend potato, cherries, blueberries, cocoa powder and dates in a high-powered blender until smooth and creamy. Transfer to a bowl and gently fold in whipped aquafaba.

Note: To make whipped aquafaba, use a hand beater or stand mixer to whip together 3/4 cup chickpea liquid (liquid from a 15 ounce can) and 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar. Whip for 5 minutes or until mixture forms stiff peaks. (This will yield more than one cup. Leftover whipped aquafaba will keep overnight in the refrigerator.)

CALORIES 184; PROTEIN 5g; CARBOHYDRATES 46g; SUGARS 25g; TOTAL FAT 2.4g; SATURATED FAT 1.2g; SODIUM 28mg; FIBER 9.7g; BETA-CAROTENE 7836ug; VITAMIN C 14mg; CALCIUM 64mg; IRON 2.8mg; FOLATE 15ug; MAGNESIUM 106mg; POTASSIUM 748mg; ZINC 1.3mg; SELENIUM 2.2ug

 

Comments (0):

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loser

04/28/2017 10:49 AM

Hello world!

patriciaswitzer

04/28/2017 06:01 PM

Hi I thought that the liquid from canned or soaked beans was the part that caused gastrointestinal distress~ Is this not true??

 

 

lovelylees57

04/28/2017 06:04 PM

I agree with patriciaswitzer above.  I thought the soaking water contained phytic acid and therefore was undesirable.  Please advise.

RaoulM replies:

04/28/2017 06:32 PM

Hi. You are correct. The soaking water should be discarded. Use the cooking water instead. That is, you discard the soaking water, rinse the beans, then use fresh water for cooking.....

 

sunnyjoya

04/28/2017 06:32 PM

Same here.  Immediately after starting to eat canned beans regularly, I noted that draining the liquid resulted in less gassiness.  But I want to try this recipe.

MartineK

04/28/2017 11:41 PM

I recently read that soaking beans gets rid of lectins which are bad. How can using the soaking water be good for us in that case. Can you clarify this for me please? Not sure what to believe, I am feeling overwhelmed with all the information. Thanks a million!

mdguy87243

04/29/2017 12:37 AM

I read that it's not the soaking water to use, but the cooking water.  I would not use the water from canned beans for anything anymore.  Since soaking my own beans and lentils for at least 12 hours and discarding the water and then cooking in fresh water, my digestive issued have mostly subsided.  I also soak almonds in the same way.  I have not tried the aquafaba,  but I wonder if it would work to use the cooking liquid after cooking soaked beans in fresh water

 

kmwilber replies:

04/29/2017 03:38 AM

For those who are more interested in using the cooking water, not the soaking/canning water, here is a link I found with information and instructions.  http://www.lazycatkitchen.com/homemade-aquafaba-vegan-egg-replacer/

Linda P.

05/01/2017 10:06 AM

Aquafaba is the cooking liquid, not the soaking liquid.  In the case of canned beans, the liquid in the can is the cooking liquid. Aquafaba is just a mixture of proteins and starches that have migrated from the beans into the water during cooking. 

kmwilber replies:

06/29/2017 10:44 AM

I've searched online and can't find details of commercial processing of canned beans that points to anything other than a very minimal pre-soak or none.  ("...few commercial canners soak dried beans before cooking. In fact, in a way they don't cook the beans at all. The heat and pressure of the canning process (called the retort) is enough to cook -- perhaps even overcook -- the beans right in the can.)  On the other hand, that very quote is from someone advocating that there is no need to presoak: http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-dd-dont-soak-dried-beans-20140911-story.html    Just rinse and cook.   As you can see, opinions vary...

marilyncugini

05/01/2017 10:34 AM

Linda, could you please add the units of measurement for the paragraph that has "?" in place of the unit of measurement?  "Cream of tartar or another acid such as vinegar or lemon juice will stabilize the aquafaba. Use ? teaspoon of cream of tartar or ? teaspoon of vinegar or lemon juice for ? cup of bean liquid."

Linda P. replies:

05/01/2017 12:26 PM

Sorry! It should be 1/4 teaspoon of cream of tartar or 1/2 teaspoon of vinegar or lemon juice for 3/4 cup of bean liquid. 

Gwen McF

05/01/2017 04:42 PM

I use aquafaba in my hummus as it seems to separate from the solids less.   I also heat the contents of the can of beans, which also helps reduce the separation of the fluids from the solids. No idea why.

Antsy

06/25/2017 06:19 PM

 Bean cooking water is fine - I usually keep it as broth because it tastes so good - but doesn't the liquid from canned beans contain nasty canning materials like lead and/or aluminum? 

kmwilber

06/30/2017 01:23 PM

I just tried a variation on the mousse (I had cooked rutabaga and carrots on hand, and used that instead of sweat potato.)   I kept the cooking water from beans I prepared the night before.  I'm qute impressesed at how "egg-white-y" the aquafaba is when whipped, and it certainly lightened up the texture of what would otherwise have been a very dense mousse.

This comment was last edited on 06/30/2017 01:23 PM